The Gang Bangers front cover

The Gang Bangers front cover

by Sean Greene
Published in 1968 by Ram Classics

I’m at a loss to describe this book – this may well be the most disturbing thing I’ve ever read.   It isn’t without its merits I suppose, but frankly I would hope that no one would seek out this book.

While The Gang Bangers promises an expose of devotees of “multiple sex,” instead it delivers a sickening stream of rape, incest, and pedophilia.   Like so many other books of this ilk, “The Gang Bangers” recounts the therapy sessions of our narrator as he counsels a family of “deviates.”  Usually the label “deviate” seems more comical than anything else.  That’s not the case here.

This tale begins with an introduction to Barbara, the daughter.  One by one we meet the son, the mother, and the father.   While the descriptions of their early sexual experiences are designed to titillate, the non-stop stream of what we now recognize as child molestation is anything but erotic.  This lurid tale reaches its apex when Mary, one of the family’s counselors, lets go of her professionalism and succumbs to her own carnal desires.

One of the few interesting moments in this book is when we meet the father.   We read about his earliest sexual experiences which consist of incest and rape.   Just as we think we’ve reached the sickening depth of human perversion, we learn the father has an even more shocking sexual secret – brace yourself for it – the father has had homosexual relations.

This book is a vivid reminder of how much society’s attitudes about child sexual abuse and homosexuality have changed since the 60s. It is difficult to reconcile how Greene can describe child sexual abuse in a matter of fact tone while reacting to the revelation of the father’s homosexual experiences with scorn: “The faggot father – the deviated daddy…” It was enough to make me cringe with nervous laughter.

Tacked onto the end of the preceeding family’s story is a short tale that has nothing to do with the preceeding storyline and isn’t enough to redeem the book. Were we simply presented with the three meat market women and their encounter with the butcher, this scene might have had erotic possibility (Let me just add if you’re going to do that with a sausage, for the love of God, have enough sense to use a condom.). Unfortunately, rather than simply presenting the tale of the erotic shenanigans of the meat market, Greene found it necessary to give us case histories of the three women and we are “treated” to more descriptions of rape and abuse.